Fruit paste, sweet nostalgia in its purest form

Fruit paste, sweet nostalgia in its purest form

Fruit paste is a delicious nostalgia right out of our childhood. Who can resist these delicious, beautifully coloured frosted squares, carefully arranged in baker shop or confectioner's windows? Professionals are well aware that fruit pastes are a vast world that appeals to young and old alike. Rediscover them here. 

First there is their color that seems to appear from an old fairy tale. Then there is the crisp sugar bead coating and finally the generous, tasty and sweet pulp.
Each French region has its own speciality. Orleans pours its quince paste (“Cotignac”) contained in small wooden boxes printed with Joan of Arc's portrait. Colmar moulds its raspberry-shaped paste into fruit shapes. Dijon is known for its "cassissines", made with blackcurrant and its liqueur. "Guignolettes" of Auvergne smell of kirsch, "pavés d'Anjou" contain Cointreau, and Tarbes chestnut pastes are flavored with rum.

A slice of history
The tradition of fruit paste goes back to the Middle Ages, when the recipe was born without knowing it. Cooking fruit into a thick paste was then a means of storing fruit well beyond their season. But their flavor quickly seduced the palates of connoisseurs and fruit pastes soon became a feature of royal tables. The oldest are made from apples, and the most prized in the history of France are apricot pastes. For centuries, their trade secret was kept by the monasteries, before crossing the threshold of the most renowned patisseries and restaurants.
For successful fruit pastes every time, Les vergers Boiron offer their frozen fruit purees. Fruit combinations, classic or adventurous mixtures, there is something for everyone, your imagination is there to make the difference. It is now up to you to invent your specialty!

We offer additional elements in this article including tips to make impeccable fruit paste.